Tag Archives: fitness

Various wearables available on the market today

The Next Battleground of the Data Revolution – Your Doctor’s Office

Wearables are gaining such explosive traction in the consumer space these days, you’d be blind (and deaf)… or perhaps just live somewhere remote to not know about them. Fitbit, Jawbone, Vivofit, Basis, you name it. There are dozens upon dozens on the market today, and that number isn’t going down any time soon. Apple is going to release their Watch soon, and many other great new ideas are on the immediate horizon. I’m looking forward to my impending pair of smart socks by Sensoria quite soon, in fact.

Various wearables available on the market today

Various wearables available on the market today

Trackers, or “wearables” (short for wearable technology) are popular because they give consumers a level of control over their lives that they never had previously. “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it”, the old management axiom goes. It’s true. If I didn’t know how active or inactive I was on a given day, how could I improve my fitness? If I don’t know what my resting heart rate is, how can I tell if I’m working out hard enough or not? Or too hard? If I wake up feeling crappy, if I don’t know how much I was tossing and turning, how can I tell why I had a bad sleep? Short answer; you can’t. And for most of history up to this point, you had to guess. You had to use a manual pedometer to count steps. You had learn how to measure your heart rate by putting fingers on your neck and watching a stopwatch. You had to go to the doctor’s office to have your blood pressure read or to have a sleep study conducted.

This is another shift in empowerment of the consumer. Think back to how we used to have to buy a car in the 1980’s or early 1990’s. All of the power resided with the car dealers, because they had control over all of the information. We had no idea what the blue book prices were, no access to vehicle history, and very little ability to comparison shop. When Kelly Blue Book went online for free, Carfax was born, and online comparison tools rose, the power shifted to the consumer. Today, car dealers make very little on each individual car sale, and instead have to try and go for volume to make money. This is exactly what is happening with health and fitness data today.

Which brings me to my point. I heard a story on NPR the other day.  “Sure You Can Track Your Health Data, but Can Your Doctor Use It?” Doctors are the new car dealers. This new empowerment of consumers armed with gobs of data are shifting the power base in health care. And like any time in history when you try to change a power base, there is backlash from those who stand to lose power. It is just human nature. Doctors are on the line now to have to shift the way they do their work, and many of them don’t like it, because their consumers are becoming more educated. Sure we are all warned about the hazards of self-diagnosis, and to consult your doctor. But on the contrary, as doctors are becoming harder and harder to access due to shortages and the “15 minute rule”, where they try to see as many patients in a day as possible, coming to the exam room armed with data to show what is important and what is not can be a real game-changer.

Dr. Paul Abramson who was interviewed in the NPR story says: “I get information from watching people’s body language, tics and tone of voice,” he says. “Subtleties you just can’t get from a Fitbit or some kind of health app.” The story also says that Dr. Abramson isn’t a technophobe, and also an engineer. What he isn’t is a data person. Or even a data scientist. And, for me, there’s the rub. Doctors are going to have to start becoming “data people”, and fast. If not, their jobs are going to evaporate and they will be replaced by those who can be. Watching people’s body language and tone of voice is fine, but a terabyte of empirical data will trump that any day. Data will tell exactly what is going on in a person’s body. Large, self-collected data sets will provide a much clearer picture of a person’s health than a 15 minute office visit can tell. Data will be more complete than a 5 or 10 minute test can tell. And, most importantly, data will allow us to start making accurate forecasts and predictions on our health, and help us avoid potential problems before they become problems.

Imagine if a person was wearing a small wrist band that does constant heart rate monitoring. Based on months of 24/7 monitoring data, imagine if an app could predict if that person was becoming at risk for having a heart attack? Or at risk for a having a stroke based on blood pressure data? This is all possible when we start having access to large, rich data sets of consumer health information. And this is only the beginning.

The problem is going to be what the problem in healthcare IT has always been. There are no overall standards or governance on how health data is stored, and each hospital, doctor’s office, and insurance company have different ways of doing it. And each is very entrenched in their own process and very reluctant to change. I worked in healthcare IT for several years (my wife has for over 25 years), and I can say from experience that it is like the Wild West. But we’re going to have to find ways to break down those walls and insist that our health care includes some expert analysis of our consumer-collected health data. We’d be silly not to.

As more and more consumers are tracking their health data, the pressure will become more intense on doctors to start incorporating it into their care plans for patients. Doctors like Dr. Abramson won’t be able to just shrug and not know what to do with it. In a few more years, vastly more patients will be coming to the exam room armed with data. Insurance companies are already starting with the pressure, too. Many plans are starting to offer discounts to members who wear a tracker and log a certain number of steps per year. Healthier people are cheaper to cover. Why not use that data in the exam room, too?

What do you think about the future or wearables and health care?

Would you use a different doctor if you knew that your data would be evaluated?

What part of this is scary to you?

New Year, New Perspective, New Peace

2014 was an amazing year for me as an athlete. If you would have told me 4 years ago that I’d be running marathons and writing about it, I would have laughed at you, and then pointed my finger at you and laughed some more. But here I am.

I was always the geek in high school. More worried about getting good grades, copy editing the school newspaper and getting to drama guild rehearsal on time than any type of sports. It wasn’t until later in life that I found my athletic competitive side. I compete with myself the worst. 2014 is evidence. If I go back just a bit to 2013, the year I ran my first half marathon, I can find my starting point. I ran my first 13.1 in 2 hours 16 minutes. Not bad for a newbie. I signed up for the Rock-n-Roll Half in Las Vegas later that year, with a kinda-sorta goal of finishing under 2 hours. Not impossible, but I didn’t truly understand the training needed to get there. I didn’t hit my goal. I finished in 2 hours 12 minutes. I was mad. Pissed off, ticked, you name it. Angry mad at myself. This is where I let my competitive side take over. I wanted that sub-2 hour half. Bad. I signed up for an April half marathon, and started training my ass off over Christmas week. I blew my goal away by finishing in 1 hour 55 minutes, setting a new Personal Record by 17 minutes. That was huge. I felt great! In my euphoria, I dove right into my next challenge (competitive side really burning high now) and signed up for my first marathon.

I set myself an aggressive goal to finish my first marathon in 4 hours. I figured if I could do a half in 1:55, that a 4 hour marathon was possible. I set my training plan and started training my ass off again. It was a hot and humid summer to train over. But I did it. Every day I got up and reminded myself that I had committed to running this marathon, both mentally, and by paying the entry fee. I was going to go make a good showing of it.

And this is where I fell down. Training for a marathon is no joke. I was running 5 days a week, and at peak, 50 miles a week. This takes a LOT of time. And effort. Add on top of that the fact that I’m a busy career man, with a challenging job during the day, and putting the finishing touches on raising a 17-year old girl to be a responsible adult, and an attentive husband to my stellar wife. That is a LOT to expect of anyone. But I did it. And what I found at the end was ugly.

I got to the point where I was dreading the run. Not another run on another hot day. I was so mentally exhausted that I kept questioning why I was doing this at all. Who was I trying to prove something to? I was physically exhausted most of the time as well. My training was aggressive to try and get me into shape to achieve my aggressive goal. But my 42-year-old body, while in pretty good shape, was having a hard time rising to the occasion. I realized I hated this. Hated it bad. I didn’t want to run anymore. It was all just too much. But my sense of duty that I committed to this race would not let me stop. So I didn’t.

I ran my marathon. I felt pretty good on race day, and mostly throughout the race. I was not in the right mental place to finish strong. I was mentally tired, and part of me just wanted to get it over with so I could get on with my life. My pace really suffered in the final 10K, as most first timers do, and I finished in 4 hours 33 minutes. Which, in retrospect, is a stellar time for a first-time marathoner in his 40’s. I finished on my own power. I should be more proud of the achievement. But whenever I think about it, all I can think about is how badly I felt at the end of all of that training.

I took most of the month of November off from running. I needed the break. Yeah I packed on a few pounds after being so active and then not. But it’s okay. I sort of started back running a little bit in December, but not much.

At the end of December, I ran one of my favorite runs, the Kris Kringle 5 miler. I hadn’t been out for a while and was certainly not in peak shape, but I went out and just ran. And I loved it. There was no pressure for a finish time or a PR. No mental grief over some expectation of performance. I just ran. And that’s when it hit me. This is how my running should be. It should be joyous that I have the strength to run, that I am able to run. I do so much love to run. Anything that detracts me from that feeling of joy in motion is bad, and I need to stay away from it.

So my goals for 2015 are to simply let go of any expectation of performance and just enjoy the crap out of my running. I’m already signed up for 7 5K’s, 1 10K, and 2 half marathons before the end of July. I don’t care how I finish. I’m just going to go and run them. And enjoy the crap out of each one. Because I can run, and I love to run. I’m going to focus more on cross training, and try to exercise something every day, because a stronger me will naturally become a faster, fitter me without having to pressure myself into some artificial goal. It will be what it is, and I’m going to be happy with it. So far, so good. I’ve been working out at something nearly every day, and am still feeling the love.

What are your goals for 2015? Have you ever felt this way about your training? How do you find “the happy” in each day’s run?

Time to Get Back to Work

Keeping up with a blog is a lot of work. There are lots of other people out there creating content, and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t feel a competitive need to keep up. The pressure of maintaining my blog became a bit much, so I put this aside for quite a while. I was shocked to see my last post was March 2014. Shame on me.

A lot has happened since then. I have a lot to write about in the coming months. And my goal is to do better at maintaining my own space here, and not worry about keeping up with anyone else.

Thanks to those who stuck with me. I know, you probably just forgot. Well, thanks for forgetting :-).

Since my last post, a ton has happened to my life as a runner.

  1. I crushed my Half Marathon goal of finishing under 2 hours coming across the finish line at 1:55.
  2. I finished my first full Marathon in October; 4:33
  3. I nearly broke myself (mentally and physically) training for said marathon.
  4. I took all of November and most of December off from running
  5. I feel rested, recovered (mentally and physically), and ready to get back to training

I’ll circle back and recap those milestones over the coming weeks in more detail. I’m going to strive to be more regular with updates. I even have a guest blogger waiting for me to get off my duff and give up some space.

Here on the final days of 2014, I’m looking forward to what will come in 2015 already. Bring it!

 

Apple is entering the Fitness Tracking market

There have been rumors spinning around the Interwebs for a long time about an Apple smart watch, or iWatch, but it has yet to surface. As Pebble, Samsung, Sony, and now Google all have either products on the market or prototypes soon to be, Apple is strangely mum on the subject.

But just a few days ago, an information leak tipped Apple’s hand a bit. Follow the link to read about the impending Apple HealthBook. While this indicates an iOS application for tracking all kinds of health-related information, you can bet your lucky stars that Apple is going to follow up with a device to feed data into that application. What will that device look like? Nobody knows at this point. There are some stunning ideas out there. There are also some guesses based on patents that Apple has filed.

Concept models for the Apple iWatch

Concept models for the Apple iWatch

So why am I excited about all of this? I’m an old-time IT pro. I’ve been in this business for a long time now (nearly 20 years) and I’ve seen some stuff. Back when personal computers were just learning how to talk to one another, and we were building networks and then hooking them into the Internet for the first time, one of the biggest problems we had was integration. There were so many different manufacturers of hardware and software, that it was often quite difficult to get all of the different parts to talk to one another properly. I remember saying back in 1996 or so, that I didn’t care if Microsoft took over the world, as long as everything worked together properly. And not long after that, Microsoft did indeed take over the PC world. And everything worked together pretty well. The story of the rise of Apple is well documented, and Apple took this idea to the next level. By producing both hardware and software, you are assured of the absolute best user experience.

Now look at the fitness tracking market today. You have apps for your smart phone. You have devices for your ankle, your wrist, or wherever. You have web portals. You have training plans and social networks. And they are all over the place. What’s the biggest issue facing the wearables market today? Integration! It’s really tough to get a holistic view of all of your health data. Some trackers only do steps and distance. Some do heart rate and body temperature. It is very hard to find a single place to put all of your data. Apple has the know-how and the reach to make this right. To make it simple, easy to use, and beautiful.

You can bet I’ll be watching this closely. This is going to be big.

 

Tech Review: Virtual Trainer Bodyweight on the iPad

Every amateur runner eventually faces the fact that “just running” isn’t enough. If you want to improve your times and/or lengthen your distances, you must must must (must) cross-train. Cross-training strengthens your body in ways just running cannot, and helps you run better, stronger, and with less of a chance of injury.

But if you are like me, and have a demanding job during the day, it can often be a challenge to find the time to get a run in, let alone try to squeeze something else into the mix. Believe me, I get this.

I used to be strictly a morning runner. I’d get up, walk the dogs, then head out to clock my miles. I was easily able to get everything in, shower, and get to work on time. That was last year. This year, I’m training harder for a Spring Half-Marathon and eyes on my first full Marathon in the fall, so my training runs have become much longer, and I can not fit my runs in during that morning gap any longer. I’d either have to get up earlier and go run in the dark and freezing outside (I already get up at 5:45am on weekdays), or be late to work every day (not really an option). So I started moving my runs to later in the day, either during my lunch break (easier to justify a long lunch than being late in the morning) or after work. Which left me with a gap of time in the mornings that I could utilize for something else.

Here’s where I found the Virutal Trainer: Bodyweight for my iPad. I was searching for something I could do with little or no gym equipment at home, but would not take too much time and still be a good workout. This app delivers on that, and then some.

The app costs $5 in the Apple App Store, but is well worth the small investment. The main screen opens up to a large array of exercises demonstrated by human beings in HD.

VT Main Screen

 

You can tap any one of the exercises and the demonstration video begins immediately. There are a couple of pre-built workout routines on the right, and you have the ability to make your own.  I started with the Tabata Workouts. There are two inside there, a Full Body routine, and an “Ass & Abs” routine as well. If you aren’t familiar with Tabata, it is similar to CrossFit. You do an array of exercises for 20 seconds each, with 10 seconds rest in between. You run through your list of exercises multiple times (you choose when you start, the default is 3 rounds).

Before you start your workout, you can touch any one of the exercises, and the demonstration video pops right up and you get to watch a real human demonstrate for you.

"Prisoner Squat" demonstration

 

Once you are ready to start, you select the routine you want to use, how many cycles of the routine you want to do, and hit the “Workout” button. Another really nice feature is that you can Air Play the videos to your Apple TV or Mac computer, so you can watch the demonstration videos on a larger screen if you want to. I have 2 Apple TV’s in the house, so I use this.

Next Exercise Prep

You get a preparatory command for the next exercise you’re about to do. They show the name and a demo video while the timer counts your 10 second rest period, then it is time to GO!

Go Go Go!

 

You do the exercise at your own pace as much or as little as you can during those 20 seconds, then you get a very short 10 seconds to rest and get into position for the next exercise.

IMG_0421

 

I was amazed at how torched I was after the first time I ran through this routine. Doing 3 run-throughs of the Full Body Tabata workout took just 12 minutes, but I was drenched with sweat and muscles quivering. How efficient is that? Who can’t spare 12 minutes in the morning? I love it!

There are tons of other apps in their library. I like this one because it doesn’t require any gym equipment. I have a little at home, but not much. Here’s a list of their app library. None are free, but most are only $5.

VT App Library

 

I’ve been using VT: Bodyweight for 3 weeks now, and I can really tell a difference. The scale is creeping down again, my BMI is also creeping down. I’m definitely feeling stronger during my runs. I’ll probably stick with the built-in workouts for a while longer, then start to build a few of my own. There are some exercises in there I’d like to include, and one unfortunate app oversight is that you cannot edit the existing workouts, or even copy them to a new list to edit. Oh well. Small deal for me.

Are there any great apps you use to help you cross-train?

My Love Affair with @FitBit Continues with the FitBit Force

My nearly 2-year-old FitBit Ultra finally bit the dust. It is pretty obvious to me that there were design issues with that model. First because I know several people who had them and the result was the same, the housing would crack and the device would fall apart. Second, because FitBit stopped making them, and the newer models are totally redesigned.

I struggled for a while deciding on how to replace it. I replaced my wife’s broken Ultra with the FitBit One earlier this year for a Mother’s Day gift, so I knew all of what that could do. I was intrigued by the FitBit Flex, but could not live without the altimeter counting my elevation and floors of stairs. I considered the Nike FuelBand second generation, because I heard rumors there was going to be a heart rate monitor built in, but when it finally released without the HRM, that was quickly kicked from my list. At almost the same time, FitBit announced the Force, which really was the answer for me. It had all of the functionality I wanted from my broken FitBit Ultra, but in the wrist-band style of tracker I had a feeling would be more to my liking. Through all of my deliberation, I did not place my pre-order for the Force on the first day. I waited a couple of weeks, and for that I had to wait over a month for it to ship. First world problems, I realize. But it is finally here, and I’ve had a couple of weeks to play with it.

Showing my step count for the day, and the little bar across the bottom shows progress towards daily goal

Showing my step count for the day, and the little bar across the bottom shows progress towards daily goal

 

What I like about my FitBit Force:

  • I never have to wonder where it is. I can feel it on my wrist.
  • It is comfortable to wear. I often forget it is even there.
  • It is WAY more accurate than the Ultra. There used to be big differences, especially while running, between FitBit and RunKeeper. No more.
  • It syncs wirelessly with my iPhone. My Ultra needed to be near the base station.
  • The charge lasts a long time, and the device will send me alerts when the battery gets low. Way cool.
  • The clasp is nice and secure. I never worry about if falling off.
  • When I registered the device late in the day, it asked if I was replacing a device, which I was, and it automatically transferred all of the data from my old Ultra tracker to my new Force. That was a NICE touch!
  • The Force will vibrate when you hit your goal for the day, and you can configure what you want that goal to be. I have mine set for my 10,000 steps per day. The buzzing cheer surprises me, but I like it.
  • The first item to display is the time. I have found that the Force has replaced my watch for most intents and purposes.
  • I have heard that in an upcoming update, the Force will do some things like my Pebble smart watch does, like vibrate and display text messages, vibrate when I get a phone call and display the name or number, and alert me to incoming emails. This could be pretty cool.

What I don’t like:

  • It is not “waterproof”. It is “splash and sweat resistant” but you can’t submerge it. The charger connection on the back is bare metal. I only take it off when I get in the shower, but part of me would prefer to just never have to take it off. The FitBit Flex, by contrast, is waterproof and can be worn in the shower or in the pool.
Here's the back of the Force. You can easily see why it isn't waterproof.

Here’s the back of the Force. You can easily see why it isn’t waterproof.

  • The clasp was REALLY hard to fasten the first couple of times. I thought I would never get it on right out of the box. It has since broken in nicely, but was a downer at first.
Here's the clasping mechanism. You have to fit the two metal "teeth" into the appropriate holes. Good luck with that the first few times.

Here’s the clasping mechanism. You have to fit the two metal “teeth” into the appropriate holes. Good luck with that the first few times.

  • Although it is really comfortable to wear all day, I find it not so comfortable to wear to bed to measure my sleep. I think part of that is the metal back on my skin. I get kinda tired of it by the end of the day, like a watch. I have been toughing it out for the data, however.

Overall I really like the device. I have loved FitBit for nearly 2 years now, and I’m going to keep on loving them for a while more. Do you use a FitBit yet? Or do you have another type of tracking device you prefer?

The Goodness of Us

The world watched a week ago aghast as two bombs erupted at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The madness of the ensuing week were difficult to grasp as reality. It almost seemed like a movie to me. The people of Boston endured and now a mere week later, one suspect is dead and the other is in custody. Race running has been changed forever.

It is easy to focus on the horror during events like these. We tend to focus on these terrible people and what could drive them to inflict such pain on innocent people. Especially against a running event. This event was very personal to me, and in many ways, I feel like I’m going through this for the first time when the rest of the nation was able to go through it after September 11th, 2001. That was a different event for me, since I was still on active duty in the U.S. Air Force. My mind was in a different place back then, and I don’t think I experienced the full weight of the tragedy like most everyone else did.

In my previous post, not even 24-hours after the Boston attack, I think I was feeling much like I did when I was in the military. Anger, vengeance, defiance. I still feel those feelings, but they have been sidelined by a sense of hope and community. On Sunday, April 21st, 2013, I participated in the annual Valley Forge Revolutionary 5-mile Run. Less than a week after the tragedy, many of us went out to run in a place sacred to the Freedom of this country to show solidarity. It was stated during the opening remarks of that race, that our fraternity of runners was attacked. This was against us all. And so we ran. While the weather was a little on the cold side for a Pennsylvania April day, it was beautiful. And you can’t ask for a better venue than Valley Forge National Park. I’m guessing it was 3-parts hard training and 1-part inspiration for the day, but I got another personal record for this 5-mile race. My RunKeeper stats:

Valley Forge Revolutionary Run 2013

And then just one day later, on Monday, April 22nd, 2013, I had the privilege to participate in a local fundraiser run where all of the proceeds were donated to the Boston One Fund. I wasn’t sure what to expect for an event like this in Reading, PA. I was very pleasantly surprised. Over 800 runners showed up to donate to the fund and show our community we are not afraid. Among those 800 were 12 who had run in the Boston Marathon. It was moving to me that they were present, as probably the 12 among us most affected by this event. And yet, here they were, proudly wearing their marathon gear and running with us. The local news media was out as well. Channel 69 News aired a small segment about the run (the last 3 minutes of the video on this page). Our local newspaper, The Reading Eagle was also there, and also published a short article and 10 photos of the event. Another inspiring event, and it shows in my times:

Run For Boston 2013

 

I started to run in June of 2012 because I needed a new way to achieve my personal fitness goals. I’d tried diets, gym memberships, all kinds or gear and tech, but nothing was getting me where I wanted to be. I remembered struggling with running while I was in the military, but never really gave it a second thought after I separated. I never anticipated the community aspect of running, and today I sit here in awe. I have said before that runners are some of the best people I know. They are competitive and tough, sure. But they are also encouraging, supportive, and welcoming. The outpouring of the goodness of us leaves me humbled. It reminds me of an excellent posting I saw on Facebook right after Boston. I can’t sum up how I feel any better than comedian Patton Oswalt did:

“Boston. Freaking horrible.

I remember, when 9/11 went down, my reaction was, “Well, I’ve had it with humanity.”

But I was wrong. I don’t know what’s going to be revealed to be behind all of this mayhem. One human insect or a poisonous mass of broken sociopaths.

But here’s what I DO know. If it’s one person or a HUNDRED people, that number is not even a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a percent of the population on this planet. You watch the videos of the carnage and there are people running TOWARDS the destruction to help out. (Thanks FAKE Gallery founder and owner Paul Kozlowski for pointing this out to me). This is a giant planet and we’re lucky to live on it but there are prices and penalties incurred for the daily miracle of existence. One of them is, every once in awhile, the wiring of a tiny sliver of the species gets snarled and they’re pointed towards darkness.

But the vast majority stands against that darkness and, like white blood cells attacking a virus, they dilute and weaken and eventually wash away the evil doers and, more importantly, the damage they wreak. This is beyond religion or creed or nation. We would not be here if humanity were inherently evil. We’d have eaten ourselves alive long ago.

So when you spot violence, or bigotry, or intolerance or fear or just garden-variety misogyny, hatred or ignorance, just look it in the eye and think, “The good outnumber you, and we always will.” – Patton Oswalt

One Year with FitBit

A little over a year ago, I decided to dive into some newer technologies to help me track my fitness goals. I wrote about the experience here. In a quick recap, I chose FitBit over some competitors because it had the most of what I wanted out of the device. I tried it out for a month, posted that update on the blog, then pretty much went dark on the topic publicly.

To mark my 1-year anniversary with my FitBit tracker, I thought it would be fitting to get back on the public stage and talk about what I like, what I don’t. Much has changed in a year.

They don't even sell this model anymore. Wow.

They don’t even sell this model anymore. Wow.

What I like:

  • It has become a part of my daily routine. I don’t have to think about wearing the tracker or checking my stats throughout the day.
  • Over the past year, many of my friends bought a FitBit, too. I like the competition you can have on the different metrics from day to day. I find it motivating.
  • Love, love, love the web-based Dashboard. Easy, clean analytics. Love trending my metrics with a year’s worth of data. Data Nerd Happy!
  • About 6 months ago, I sprung for the FitBit Aria scale. Automatically uploads my weight measurements to my dashboard. Super-awesome. No more hiding bad days or fudging a weigh-in.

What I Don’t Like:

  • I stopped using the little neoprene sleeve to attach the tracker to my wrist while I sleep. Tracking sleep is important, but I found the sleeve a nuisance. 
  • I find I really don’t use the iPhone app at all. Not that it isn’t useful, I just don’t personally have a need for it. I use the web-based dashboard every single day.
  • The tracker doesn’t really stay on my belt very well, so I’ve taken to just keeping it in my front pocket. It is pretty small, but I do notice it in my pocket all the time.

Recently, FitBit announced the Flex which is the tracker inside of a flexible wrist band. I’m curious about it because I think it might be more convenient to wear, but the lack of an altimeter really bugs me. I find the altimeter a must-have.

Does it work?

Well, yes and no. Not a perfect answer I realize. I say Yes because between the FitBit tracker and the Aria scale, I am completely aware of where I am in my fitness goals every single day, or any minute of any day. I know how active I am, how much more active I should be, and how much I weigh with a decent BMI estimate. I say No because if you look at what I weighed a year ago when I first got FitBit (211) and today (202), I really haven’t reached my weight goals as I wanted to. It’s not FitBit’s fault per se. When I chose FitBit, I liked that it was passive and didn’t bug me during the day to get up and move. Perhaps that is something that warrants further research. My goal remains, after 1 year, to get my body weight down to a more comfortable 190 lbs. This is a big part of why I started to run, so I could be more efficient in burning my calories and slim down without starving myself. I’ll go back and say Yes again because I really can’t imagine doing without it. It has become a part of my daily routine, and I count on it being close by to tell me where I am with my goals each day.

Edit: I got a request to see some metrics. Great idea! Here they are:

Year grain metrics from my FitBit Dashboard

Year grain metrics from my FitBit Dashboard

Why do I run?

I’m probably the most unlikely runner you’ll ever meet. If you would have told me a year ago that I’d be running races and loving it, I would have laughed so hard I would cry. Seriously. Why? Simple. After 8 years of active duty in the U.S. Air Force, I learned just about every bad way there is to run, and often got hurt. My feet ached, my knees hurt and would swell up painfully. Running in formation is bad for me. I’m 6’3″, so short choppy steps over and over are not the best way to run mechanically. I’ve struggled with my knees ever since, and that was over 10 years ago. Coupled with being a nerd and not athletically inclined, I just had bad ideas about running in my head.

Fast-forward to today. Now I’m 40 years old, have a demanding desk job where I sit all day. And sit. And sit. I don’t have a gym near by that is convenient to use, and I don’t have enough home gym equipment to make a big difference. I’m a tech nerd, so I started trying to use technology tools to help keep my weight in order. I’ll be writing up reviews of all of the apps and tools and equipment I’ve used over the years in more detail later on. Back to the story. Round-about last summer (July 2012), I was inspired by my friend and colleague Dallas Marks who started tweeting the fact that he was using an app called Couch to 5K. I thought about it for a long time, but kept thinking that I can’t run. It hurts my knees and my feet. But finally on a day when I tipped the scale at 215lbs, I knew I had to try something very different. I downloaded the app and I gave it a try, and I haven’t looked back since. And guess what? My knees feel great. The stronger my legs get, the less knee pain I have. Oh they still get a good ache on if I get to aggressive or hit too many hills, but overall they feel better than they ever have.

I found out quickly that not only could I run, but that I really enjoyed it. I mean REALLY enjoyed it. I ran my first 5K in September 2012 and finished in just under 30 minutes. No awards won, but a respectable time.

Just before my first 5K race in September 2012

Just before my first 5K race in September 2012

My results for Zane's Run, Malvern, PA September 30th, 2012

My results for Zane’s Run, Malvern, PA September 30th, 2012

The question at hand, “Why do I run?”.

I run because I love to get outside and breathe the fresh air. I love to get some good, efficient exercise and make my body leaner and stronger. I love to be competitive and race in organized events, constantly striving to get a better time or go a longer distance. I love meeting positive-minded healthy people at these events. I love how I feel after a good, long run. I love being able to eat more of what I like, because I burn so many calories on a good run. I love that no matter where I travel, I need only bring my running shoes and I can keep up with my workout routine.

I hope to use this site for a couple of things. I hope to catalog my runs and races, to show whoever is interested that if a desk-jockey computer nerd like me can do it, nearly anyone can. I also hope to use this space to discuss and review the technology I use and new things I try to keep myself on track. Thanks for reading. Get out there and run!